Welcome to Edinburg, ND!

Northeast North Dakota is a well-kept secret, especially the little town of Edinburg. It sits on the edge of the fertile farmland of the Red River Valley and the prairies of the west. Edinburg has a population of about 190 people with the drive, dreams and heart of cities 10 times its size. Edinburg could be a "throw-back" to the 50's with its pristine cleanliness, manicured yards and well-kept homes, but it is most definitely planted in the 21st century with citizens who strive to keep Edinburg very much alive!

Edinburg is a great place to live!


This Week's news

 

DURING WWII N. ORDAHL, THE BANKER AT THE TIME, COMPILED, TYPED AND SENT A HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER TO THE LOCAL SERVICEMEN SERVING OUR COUNTRY. HE WANTED THE MEN AND WOMEN TO KNOW WHAT WAS GOING ON BACK HOME. DAVID MONSON GAVE ME COPIES OF THE PAPERS CALLED "THE SERVICEMAN". I WILL SHARE A FEW TIDBITS FROM TIME TO TIME.

THIS IS FROM THE MAY 1945 SERVICEMAN:

The news of President Roosevelt's sudden death was received with increduous amazment in Edinburg as everywhere else. We could not believe it until it was confirmed by radio and press.

The greatest shock came to Vice-President Truman. Upon learning of the President's passing he turned grey in the face. He stated, "the moon and the stars have fallen on me. Pray for me if ever you pray".

Gutterud and Nelson, under active management of Orlin T. Nelson, are making extensive improvements and re-arrangements of their store building and warehouse. They are tearing out the old wooden floor and putting in a new cement floor. In the front of the building occupied by the hardware department we find Oliver Bolstad dispensing hardware and attending the gasoline pump at the filling station. Oliver has been employed by the State Seed Department as potato inspector during the season of 1944 and 1945. He has taken this new job temporarily until another potato season rolls around.

Joe Wallum has been depot agent in Edinburg for almost 2 years. He came over from Hoople. We see Joe going down to work early in the morning before most of us have had time to rub the sleep out of our eyes much less wash down accummulated rustiness in our throat with a cup of coffee.

We learn that James Haug, a member of the Merchant Marines is visiting his parents Mr. & Mrs. James Haug on furlough.

 

"THE SERVICEMAN" is sponsored by the Lutheran Brotherhood of Edinburg, Odalen and Union and edited by N. Ordahl. Valuable assistance has been rendered by Miss Johansen in mimeographing and wrestling with a difficult mimeograph machine. Thank you to Mrs. Sylvia Austinson for cutting front piece stencils, Mrs Gordon Gjelten for reading manuscripts to the typist and to Mrs. Ernest Nelson and Mrs. Al Loe for the news items. The editor acknowledges with thanks all monetary contributions which make it possible for us to buy paper, stencils and postage. We also express our sincere appreciation for all the letters received from servicemen. While we know this issue of "The Serviceman" will be too late for Christmas, we nevertheless wish all of our boys and other readers a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. (This was written by N. Ordahl at the bottom of the last page of the December issue),

Life is good in Edinburg.

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

ben-sadie

Ben Storhaug and Sadie Sondeland at their wedding shower last Saturday. Sadie's grandfather, Don Hylden is getting a perfect picture.

 

snow melting

This is what we all have been waiting for - the streets in town to be free of their snow pack.

 

steen house

The house we referred to as the "Steen House" when I was growing up was torn down today. It has been in disrepair for many years. It is sad to see a landmark go.